ACCELERATED UNDERGRADUATE

Human Services

Bachelor of Science in Human Services (BSHS)


Serving Others

Study Human Services at LBC 

Make a Difference in Someone's Life

This program is designed to equip Christian students to go into diverse communities of need as servant-helpers, ministering to the disenfranchised in areas like entry-level social service, community outreach programs, non-profits and more.

Students in this program will graduate ready to serve. Every student in the human services major will complete at least 350 hours of real-world experience in internships and practice. This means you'll leave LBC job-ready, with lots of practical, hands-on experience.

Our human services program offers a foundational education where students can fully understand and perfect their gifts of helping others. Programmatic emphasis is given to equip students with current innovative theories and practical applications used within the diverse groups of social service settings. Additionally, students can choose elective courses that speak to their personal calling.

Why Study Human Services at LBC?

  • Prepare Yourself For Grad School: Our human services program gives you the groundwork you need to continue your studies in graduate school. 
  • LBC Is a Member of NOHS: The National Organization of Human Services recognizes Lancaster Bible College as a member.
  • Fast & Flexible Schedule: The fast-paced schedule allows you to concentrate on one 6 week course at a time.
  • Life Experience Credit: Earn college credits from our evaluation of your life experiences.
  • Accredited: Earn your degree from an accredited Bible college in PA.
  • Experienced Faculty: Our program is taught by professors who have a passion to teach from their years of hands-on experience in the field.
  • Integrate your Christian faith and calling with your professional skills and acumen.

"Whatever you did for one of the least of these brothers and sisters of mine, you did for me." - Matthew 25:40

Curriculum Plan

Human Services (120 Credits)

Human Services Major: 39 Credits
Biblical Studies Major: 30 Credits
General Education: 42 Credits
Electives: 9 Credits

Sample Course Outline

HSV 200 Introduction to Human Services

This course examines the broad range of services and functions of the human service professional. Students become knowledgeable about the many roles and functions of the human service professional, and gain an understanding of the types of agencies where human service professionals are employed. This course offers a general overview of the human service profession. The course will assist the student in developing a professional identity. In addition, students will learn about the helping process, the roles and functions of the human service professional, and key issues related to the professional development of the human service professional.

HSV 202 Human Diversity

This course will focus on diversity as it relates to race, ethnicity, gender and social class. Students are introduced to the effects of oppression and prejudice on individuals and groups in contemporary culture within the United States of America. The perception and presumptions of cultural diversity are introduced in the course, as students become familiarized with the two important elements of cultural diversity - understanding and awareness. By understanding the concepts of “culture” and “diversity” this course provides students with a better grasp of diversity categories, definitions, and the characteristics and systems of cultures. Critical thinking skills are encouraged as student attempt to define their personal presupposition about Christ and culture. The overall goal is to exemplify the challenges and benefits of diversity and strengthen the possibilities of living and working together in a multicultural society. Implications for the practice of human service will be discussed as it pertains to Christian ideology and culture.

HSV 206 Foundations & Theories of Human Systems

This course is a continuation of SOC 326. Students continue to explore the person–in the-environment (PIE), with emphasis on human service delivery at the micro, mezzo, and macro levels. Students in this class will explore the origin, foundation, and development of system theory as a major model used in human services. To conceptualize and integrate prevention, maintenance, intervention, rehabilitation, students are introduced to helpful tools used for assessing the ecological context. The course examines the use of system theory in providing a range of services to individuals, groups, family, organizations, community, and society. The political, ideological, and theological implications of servicing humans in the environment are explored.

HSV 208 Policies and Practices in Social Welfare

This course is an overview of social policy development and evaluation. Students are challenged to analyze policy from an agency standpoint, as well as on national and local levels. The course will also survey the history and current development of policies designed to serve those in need. Social welfare agencies oriented to meet the needs of special populations (e.g. the aged, children and youth, rural and urban groups), and the policies influencing their development will be critically analyzed. Special attention is placed on the role of activism and advocacy in creating policies for the poor.

HSV 210 Agency Field Practicum I

The field experience course is designed to give students practice opportunities in the delivery of human services to diverse settings within social services agencies. Fieldwork provides an environment and context to integrate the knowledge, theory, skills, and professional behavior that are currently being taught in the classroom. As such, this course integrates skills and knowledge from previous courses and applies them through classroom discussions, role-play, and presentations to practical applications within the field. Through agency observation and class discussion, this course is a beginning opportunity for students to explore and refine their understanding of human services while establishing personal and professional future goals. Students are expected to complete a total of 200 between three field placements.

HSV 212 Group Experience & Self Evaluation

The course will provide students with an in depth self-evaluation for both personal development and professional development for the human services field. Student learning will occur through in class instruction and group participation during class. The teaching method will be experiential in nature.

HSV 300 Family Systems

A systematic Christian perspective of family life in modern society covering every issue that affects the family including--marriage, parenting, sexuality, communication, and social dynamics is covered in this class. Students are reintroduced to the first most established God given human institutions – the family. In this course students are transformed as they dig deep into Scripture, ever mindful of context, in order to develop a theological basis for family relationships. The course integrates a Christian perspective with insights from psychological and sociological studies to provide an analysis of the American family from a Christian perspective.

HSV 310 Agency Field Practicum II

The field experience course is designed to give students practice opportunities in the delivery of human services to diverse settings within social services agencies. Fieldwork provides an environment and context to integrate the knowledge, theory, skills, and professional behavior that are currently being taught in the classroom. As such, this course integrates skills and knowledge from previous courses and applies them through classroom discussions, role-play, and presentations to practical applications within the field. Through agency observation and class discussion, this course is a beginning opportunity for students to explore and refine their understanding of human services while establishing personal and professional future goals. Students are expected to complete a total of 200 between three field placements.

HSV 400 Advocacy & Methods for Human Functioning

This course is designed to explore the potential use and benefits of alternative dispute resolution in human services as a part of the advocacy process. Students will explore the leadership role of the advocate, learn about various disputes resolution models, and practice mediation skills. This transformational course gives students the opportunity to identify with key Biblical characters that were called to “do justice”, and “show mercy”. Students will experience the roles of a Christian mediator, an advocate, and agency representative through role-play in dyads and small groups. The legal aspects of the roles of activist are also discussed.

HSV 401 Community Development Assessment

This advanced human services skill development course examines the organizational structure of communities and special populations. A focal aspect of this course is developing and implementing a community-based project, giving students the opportunity to develop project leadership skills, as change agents and Godly servants. Within this course students examine and initiate a social change process that addresses the human service needs of a special urban population. As a group, students will select a community to survey and complete a “needs assessment”. Students are expected to assess one of the communities in which they have completed their field experience placement. In addition, students will gain knowledge of the process to effect social change through advocacy work at all levels of society including community development, community and grassroots organizing, and local and global activism. In this course, students are oriented to think not only in terms of individual needs, but also of group and community needs while applying a biblical worldview to vulnerable populations.

HSV 402 Organization & Case Management

This course covers principles, practices, and issues in case management within human service organizations. The diagnosis and treatment of developmental, psychological, and psychiatric problems and treatments resources in lease restrictive and most cost effective settings will be defined. Students will gain a deeper understanding of interpersonal relationships in organizations framed from a biblical worldview and ethical contexts related to perception, impression management, managing diversity, self-disclosure, coaching, conflict management, influence, power, and politics. Furthermore, this course will examine the characteristics and comprehensive functions of effective human service organizations that are client-based and mission-driven.

HSV 480 Senior Capstone Experience

This course is an overview of social policy development and evaluation. Students are challenged to analyze policy from an agency standpoint, as well as on national and local levels. The course will also survey the history and current development of policies designed to serve those in need. Social welfare agencies oriented to meet the needs of special populations (e.g. the aged, children and youth, rural and urban groups), and the policies influencing their development will be critically analyzed. Special attention is placed on the role of activism and advocacy in creating policies for the poor. 6 credits

Careers and Jobs in Human Services

  • Eligibility Worker
  • Human Services Screener
  • Human Services Liaison
  • Behavioral Management Aide
  • Case Management Aide
  • Community Outreach Worker
  • Juvenile Court Liaison
  • Probation Officer
  • Rehabilitation Case Worker

How Does the Accelerated Course Schedule Work?

The Accelerated program consists of TWO terms:

  1. Fall: July–December
  2. Spring: January–June

Each term is comprised of FOUR course sessions. A course session runs for SIX classes and runs back-to-back across all the weeks of the year. Due to holidays and breaks, a course session may vary between 6-8 weeks. Exact dates for each term are available through the Accelerated Office.

Students may choose to take their courses either in class, online, or both.

  • In class
    Students taking on-site classes come once a week for five weeks per course. Our courses typically meet on Tuesday nights from 6 to 10 PM. During the sixth week of the course, class does not meet so that  students can complete their course work.

  • Online classes
    Students taking online courses are not required to attend class at any time. Instead, they engage in collaborative learning through eCampus (Schoology), our learning management system. Learn more about studying online.

Determining What Courses To Take

Each student’s path to completion is unique, depending upon the courses you are transferring into the program. The curriculum plan above gives a broad picture of the required credits. If your transfer credits come from mostly one of those areas, you will need to take credits in the other areas. The remaining courses you need for graduation can best be determined after reviewing your transcripts. With flexible electives, Bible and Theology requirements, and General Education requirements, most students are able to transfer to LBC the maximum number of credits.

Credits for Prior Learning. Students can earn up to 30 life experience credits, through the Credits for Prior Learning evaluation process, which will often reduce the time to complete a degree. The life experience credit evaluation process is done after a student begins a program.


When Can I Start?

As soon as you are ready. LBC has 8 entry points per year meaning you are only ever a few weeks away till the next course starts.


Looking for Ways to Finance Your Degree?

Our LBC Financial Aid Office can help you navigate through the process. Learn more

A Closer Look: Accelerated Program

Featured Alumnus: Carroll Briggs ('17)

Hear from Carroll Briggs about his experience earning his degree online through LBC's accelerated undergraduate degrees program.

Have Questions? Talk with a Recruiter.


Lancaster Bible College|Capital Seminary & Graduate School is an equal opportunity institution that does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, sex (except where sex is a bona fide occupational qualification), ancestry, national origin, age, disability, veteran status, or genetic information. This policy applies to all terms and conditions of employment, admission to and enrollment with the College.